Vision Zero

The number of pedestrians, cyclists and drivers killed in L.A. traffic rose sharply in 2016

From The LATimes.com

 

Traffic deaths in Los Angeles rose sharply despite a high-profile campaign by Mayor Eric Garcetti and other city leaders to eliminate fatal traffic crashes.

In 2016, the first full year that Garcetti’s Vision Zero policy was in effect in L.A., 260 people were killed in traffic crashes on city streets, an increase of almost 43% over the previous year.

Rising traffic deaths appear to be more than a one-year aberration: So far in 2017, crash fatalities are 22% higher than in the same period last year.

When Garcetti announced L.A.’s Vision Zero, he sought a 20% drop in traffic deaths by the end of 2017. This year’s higher fatality rate and some funding questions underscore the challenges the program still faces.

Vision Zero’s advocates say they have spent more than a year analyzing traffic collision data to pinpoint a series of corridors that have seen the most serious injuries and deaths. Some of those streets are due to receive overhauls aimed at slowing down drivers and reducing fatalities.

Los Angeles’ increase in traffic deaths outpaces national trends. In 2016, 40,200 people died in crashes involving cars, a 6% increase over the previous year, according to the National Safety Council.

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L.A. Debuts New Interactive Vision Zero Map

From StreetsBlog.org

The city of Los Angeles has a new interactive Vision Zero map. The map shows the locations of recent traffic fatalities, identifying them by age, gender, and whether those killed were traveling by foot, bike, or car.

In case readers are not already familiar with Vision Zero, it is the city’s adopted policy to reduce traffic deaths to zero. The policy was first adopted as part of the city’s Mobility Plan 2035 and strengthened via mayoral directive. Numerous city departments – including Transportation, Police, Planning, and Public Works – are working alongside community groups to reduce fatalities and injuries. Vision Zero efforts focus primarily along the city’s High Injury Network (HIN): the six percent of streets where 65 percent of all deaths and severe injuries take place. As part of the city’s 2017 Vision Zero Action Plan, staff thoroughly analyzed crash data to identify 40 priority corridors within the High Injury Network. The city’s meager Vision Zero programs would take a major leap under a funding proposal currently wending its way through council approvals.

L.A.’s new map went online yesterday. It is the result of a motion by Councilmember Paul Koretz directing LADOT, with the Bureau of Engineering and the Information Technology Agency, to develop an interactive web-based Vision Zero HIN Map that included various data layers showing death and injury locations, similar to San Francisco’s interactive Vision Zero website.

 

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