MBC Thursday Night Ride – Ice Cream!

Destination: Fosselman’s Ice Cream Co.
Distance: 20 miles round trip
Riding level: Intermediate
Meet at 6:30pm, roll out at 7:00pm
Montebello Civic Center
1600 W. Beverly Blvd.
Montebello, CA
Route:
http://www.mapmyride.com/us/montebello-ca/mbc-fosselman-s-ice-cream-co-route-280582423

How aero tucks work for the pros on descents

From Bicycling.com

 

As the Tour de France heads into the mountains, we’re seeing some some unconventional descending positions, as riders aim to gain every second of free speed they can muster. Here’s what aerodynamic experts have to say about the pros’ super tucks, and some tips on refining your own.

“Cylinders. That’s what slows you down,” says Ingmar Jungnickel, aerodynamics R&D engineer for Specialized Bicycles. “Bike fitting is often focused on the rider’s back, but what we learned in the wind tunnel is that legs are 50 percent of your total drag.”

The quest to minimize drag from the body’s “cylinders”—legs, arms and head—has caused pro and elite racers to assume awkward aero positions on big descents, like Chris Froome’s famous top tube-sitting Stage 8 tuck at last year’s Tour de France.

“Everyone has two giant tree trunks going down to the frame,” explains Chris Yu, Specialized’s director of integrated technology. The idea is that “by sitting on the top tube, you’re bending your legs and reducing the height and surface area exposed to the wind, which cuts resistance and saves time.”

 

Read More

Woah, what 16 stage of the Tour de France does to cyclist’s legs

From the LAtimes.com

It’s OK if you need a moment to take it all in. All those veins ready to burst out of his legs. Those sun-drenched knees. Those multicolored feet.

That is one insane photo — and it was taken with five stages still remaining.

Let’s hope Poljanski, who was in 75th place overall after Stage 16, is too tired to use social media by the time the race wraps up on Sunday.

Or maybe we should be hoping to see just what his legs and feet look like at that point.

I really can’t decide.

Take a virtual ride and decide: Is it safe to bike to work in Los Angeles?

Los Angeles is arguably the most dangerous big city in America in which to be a bike rider, which may be why only 1% of people in L.A. commute to work by bike. And it’s getting more dangerous by the year. L.A. Times Opinion writer Matthew Fleischer takes you on a 360-degree tour of his morning bike commute to point out the pitfalls of cycling to work in L.A. — and what it would take to make the city a safer place for cyclists.

Milwaukee Forges Ahead With Its First Bike Boulevards

From USAStreetsBlog.org

Milwaukee will be getting its first bike boulevards, the city announced this week, the beginning of what should eventually be a citywide network of low-traffic, low-stress streets for cycling.

The city has identified two intersecting streets, totaling about two miles, to start out with. Details are still in development, but typically, bike boulevards involve diverting motor vehicle through traffic away from streets and implementing measures to further slow down cars and make cycling more convenient and safe.

Graham Kilmer at Urban Milwaukee reports:

When it comes to managing speed on a bike boulevard, anything from simple speed limit reductions to speed humps and curb build outs can be employed.

But for Milwaukee’s first bike boulevards, which are in the early planning stages, planners are looking at upgrading signalized intersections in order to “quickly and consistently pick up bicyclists on the corridor waiting to cross,” Hannig said. Also, there’s the possibility of replacing some four-way stops with neighborhood-scale traffic circles or, “similar traffic calming treatments to keep people on bicycles moving while maintaining neighborhood-appropriate travel speeds and discouraging cut-through traffic.”

Bike boulevards are another citywide infrastructure investment called for in the 2010 planning document, Milwaukee by Bike, which calls for the creation of 54 miles of bike boulevards.

 

Read More